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Cherishing it

- This blog post is written by Sarah Lundgren - 

For those who don’t know me, I’m Sarah, and I’m at the beginning of my junior year of college. This past summer, I interned in NYC, and it was such a dream come true. It was a long summer — I worked for 13 weeks — but I loved it. And honestly, I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t come into this semester looking at UNC as if it were just my last barrier before I got to go back to doing what I wanted to do and living where I wanted to live. 

But now that it’s October, and I’m knee-deep in midterms, papers and projects, I’m suddenly overcome with wanting to take a step back to recognize that I should probably cherish this while I have it. 

Because in two years, throwing myself into passion projects is going to be considerably harder. All of my friends won’t be just across campus, down the street or even a walk across my kitchen’s length away. There will be no more basketball games, I won’t work for The Daily Tar Heel anymore and I won’t have The Superhero Project. All of those things will just be memories, like the ones I grew up hearing my parents talk about. 

And though I’ve spent a large portion of my time in college just thinking about how I couldn’t wait to get out, I’m thankful for the moments when I can get it through my head that I’m incredibly lucky to be where I am now. 

This leads me to think about this: while I’m in my third year of college, The Superhero Project is only in its second. And as a director, I feel like I’m through the portion of being stressed and trying to figure out precisely what my next step will be. Instead, I’ve entered the phase where I can cherish the work that our organization wants to do. I can take a step back and appreciate the passion a lot of people carry for TSP. I can recognize the talents everyone else has; I can see where my own strengths and weaknesses lie. 

The Superhero Project isn’t perfect. Our directors and members have a lot of other things going on, but it’s incredibly inspiring to see how much everyone can bring to the table. Being part of this organization makes me so thankful that I have landed in a place where I can work with others for the sole purpose of trying to make the world a better place. Not for pay. Not for the betterment of myself. Not as a spring board for everything else I want to be doing. 

I’m truly going to miss The Superhero Project when I graduate from college. I’ll miss the friends I’ve made and the work I’ve done, but I’ll miss the work I get to watch others do and the things I’ve collaborated on the most. It’s rare to have so much talent in one place, and I feel so privileged to just be in a space where I can witness everyone else shine. It makes me want to shine, too. 

Honestly, UNC has kind of felt like endlessly waiting to pick someone up before a trip for me. Impatiently waiting, because though you’ve shaped what’s next, you’re mostly just excited for what could come. 

And though I’ve never liked waiting, I’m glad I can see the beauty in where I am. I’m glad that I have The Superhero Project to do that for me. 

 

  Sarah Lundgren is a junior from Winston-Salem, N.C. studying Public Relations and American history. Contact her at   sarlund@live.unc.edu   to get involved with the Superhero Project publishing committee.     Supported by a Robert E. Bryan Fellowship from the APPLES Service-Learning Program, an offering of the Carolina Center for Public Service at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Sarah Lundgren is a junior from Winston-Salem, N.C. studying Public Relations and American history. Contact her at sarlund@live.unc.edu to get involved with the Superhero Project publishing committee. 

Supported by a Robert E. Bryan Fellowship from the APPLES Service-Learning Program, an offering of the Carolina Center for Public Service at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

 

 

 

 

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